1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 147

Barnes Foundation Archives 2012 - səhifə 8

səhifə8/147
tarix22.07.2018
ölçüsü3.05 Mb.

Albert C. Barnes Correspondence 1902-1951  ABC

- Page 17 -

directors. Barnes and Roberts, who eventually became Chester County neighbors in the 1940s, continued

to correspond regarding legal and personal matters until 1950.

The correspondence throughout the 1920s provides comprehensive documentation of the planning for

the Barnes Foundation itself: its conception and the construction of its buildings. Barnes’s detailed

correspondence with architect Paul Philippe Cret includes the technical aspects of construction such as

lists of sub-contractors, cost estimates, discussions regarding building stone and roofing materials, and

suggestions for the placement of the Foundation buildings within an established arboretum. Cret’s files

also include correspondence between himself and artist Jacques Lipchitz, who created the bas-reliefs

decorating the exterior of the buildings, as well as plans and drawings for a tea house, and a graphite and

colored pencil drawing of the portico of the Gallery building depicting the African design elements in its

tiled decoration.

The activities of the early years of the Barnes Foundation – its staff, teachers and students, educational

curriculum, European tours, and book and journal publications – are also well documented in this

correspondence. Included are Barnes’s letters to educators and scholars such as Laurence Buermeyer

and Thomas Munro. While Buermeyer’s name may not have the same resonance as others who wrote

to Barnes, their correspondence from 1915 to 1951 contains letters, notes, copy edited drafts, and re-

written chapters, clearly demonstrating his vast contribution to the Foundation’s publications including its

primary text, the Art in Painting (1925).

Insight into Barnes’s hopes for the Foundation, and his problems and decisions regarding the construction

of the buildings are also found in correspondence with Paris art collector and dealer Paul Guillaume. This

correspondence is one of the only collections of Guillaume’s letters extant, spanning ten years beginning

in 1922. Their letters, in French and English, cover a wide range of subjects such as negotiations with

dealers, gossip from Paris, and health and family issues. Barnes’s acquisition of Modern art and his

extensive collection of African art is documented by their letters, notes, lists of purchased artwork,

receipts, and shipping statements.

Evidence of Barnes’s keen affinity for African American art and culture is found in his correspondence

with Charles S. Johnson, Alain Locke, and James Weldon Johnson, as well as his many anonymous

donations to African American organizations such as the NAACP, the Association for the Study of Negro

Life and History, the Armstrong Association, and the National Urban League’s journal, Opportunity.

Correspondence with the Manual and Industrial Training School for Youth in Bordentown, New Jersey,

highlights Barnes’s love of African American music and includes invitations to concerts performed by its

Bordentown Glee Club in the Foundation’s Gallery. Letters with music director and composer Frederick

J. Work include song lists, lyrics, references to music scholarships provided for Work and several of his

students, guest lists, and menus and receipts for lunches and Sunday suppers at the Foundation.

In 1929, Barnes sold the A.C. Barnes Company to the Zonite Products Corporation. Files from both

companies include letters and legal papers regarding the Zonite label and the trademark for Argyrol,

Barnes’s resignation as president of the A.C. Barnes Company, and his waiver for the sale and transfer of

his stock.

From 1930 to 1939, the correspondence tracks Barnes’s activities as president of the Barnes Foundation

as well as his work as an author, lecturer, benefactor, and art collector. Barnes’s correspondence from

this period contains letters from artists such as Jules Pascin, Georgia O’Keeffe, Giorgio de Chirico, and

photographer Carl Van Vechten. Further documentation regarding the provenance of the art collection can



Albert C. Barnes Correspondence 1902-1951  ABC

- Page 18 -

be found in letters, invitations, exhibition catalogues, receipts, and shipping statements from art dealers

such as Pierre Matisse, Alfred Stieglitz, Galerie Barbazanges, Paul Rosenberg, Tetzun-Lund, Caroll

Carstairs, and Kraushaar Galleries.

Correspondence with Henri Matisse regarding the commission for The Dance mural (2001.25.50)

installed in the Main Gallery includes their financial agreement, notes, and letters in French with some

translations. Matisse also included sketches describing the placement for his paintings,   Three Sisters

(BF25, 363, 888), in the Gallery. Barnes and Matisse corresponded from 1930 until 1950.

Correspondence during the 1930s also documents Barnes’s travels to Europe to conduct research

at museums and galleries for the Foundation’s books. Included are letters, notes, and drafts from

members of the Foundation staff which support the manuscript collections found in the archives for the

Foundation’s book publications, The French Primitives and Their Forms (1931),   The Art of Henri- Matisse (1933),   The Art of Renoir (1935), and   The Art of Cézanne (1939).

Records reflecting Barnes’s inclusion of Native American art in the collection can be found in

correspondence in the early 1930s with Western American art dealers which include receipts for jewelry,

pottery, and textiles. By the end of the decade, correspondence with antique dealers such as Stony Batter

Antique Exchange, Robert Burkhardt, Ellen Penrose, A. J. Pennypacker, and Clarence Ulrich contains

letters, price lists, and receipts documenting Barnes’s additional acquisitions of American decorative arts

and fine crafts such as Pennsylvania German chests, chairs, ironwork, brass, tin, copper, ceramics, pewter,

textiles, and glass.

The correspondence from 1940 until Barnes’s death in 1951 documents the purchase of Barnes’s country

home, Ker-Feal, in Chester County, the hiring – and firing – of English philosopher Bertrand Russell

to teach at the Foundation, Barnes’s charitable activities during the Second World War, and continued

efforts to create a link between the Barnes Foundation and an established university.

In 1942 alone, over 1,800 correspondents from across the country responded to magazine articles

published about Barnes – one in House & Garden and a four part series in the   Saturday Evening Post.

Included in this year are the letters, notes, and drafts of essays written by Barnes and Violette de Mazia

which were submitted to the editorial staff of   House & Garden describing the educational purpose of the

American decorative art collection displayed at Ker-Feal.

Correspondence from the 1940s includes plans and proposals documenting the expansion of Ker-Feal’s

main house by the architectural firm Kneedler, Mirick and Zantzinger. Additional provenance regarding

the collection at Ker-Feal can be found in letters discussing the authenticity of antique furniture, lists of

purchases, and receipts from local dealers such as Hattie Klapp Brunner, Charles M. Heffner, Charles

Vandeveer, Helena Penrose, and Joseph K. Kindig.

Evidence of Barnes’s support of the war effort during the Second World War can be found within

correspondence and forms filed with the United States Office of Price Administration regarding gasoline

rationing and the donation of crops grown at Ker-Feal. Correspondence with Fraser, Morris Co. and

CARE includes pamphlets, price lists, brochures, and receipts for food and clothing parcels that Barnes

purchased and sent to his friends in Europe. This correspondence also includes letters from former

Foundation students-turned-soldiers as well as many others service men who wrote to Barnes from all

over the world.



Dostları ilə paylaş:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


bastaushi-seloli-okrug.html

basti-piyaz--allium-cepa.html

bastomar-seloli-okrug.html

bastyan-yulius-francevich.html

bat---kerbela-olaynda--su.html